Bluprint recollects 6 of the most Remarkable Structures from its archive that are worth revisiting 

Filipino culture has this saying, “He who does not know how to look back at where he came from will never get to his destination.” This is a reminder that part of moving forward is to look back on the past, the ones where great lessons are learned. Bluprint highlights these structures which predominantly conveyed great design solutions to the needs of the project, made an incredible impact on the built environment, its end users, and even to the designers, encouraging for a better and more holistic approach in their future designs.

The National Museum of Natural History

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Bluprint

The National Museum of Natural History is one of the most successful restoration projects and adaptive reuse designs for an old institutional building in the Philippines. The mixture of bold innovation and respect for heritage and conservation are the key factors to its success. With careful study, research, and involvement in the museum’s collection, the design team of architect Dominic Galicia and interior architect Tina Periquet arrived at the concept of DNA where every living thing possesses it and is identified because of its distinctive characteristics. This DNA resulted in the construction of the Tree of Life, which is similar to a double-helix DNA which became the main attraction of the museum.

The ParkRoyal Hotel on Pickering

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ParkRoyal Hotel on Pickering by WOHA Architects, Photo by Patrick Bingham Hall
Bluprint
ParkRoyal Hotel on Pickering by WOHA Architects, Photo by Patrick Bingham Hall

Constructed in 2013, the ParkRoyal Hotel is located at Upper Pickering Street in Chinatown, in the Outram district of Singapore. The masterpiece was designed by the award-winning, green-city advocates, Singapore-based WOHA Architects. According to the design team, ParkRoyal on Pickering was designed to be a “hotel-as-garden” that would double the green potential of its site while incorporating energy-saving features throughout the property. In certain areas, the garden balconies are extended to a good measure delivering an authentic garden feel. Also, the greenery flourishes all throughout the entire complex and all the trees and gardens in the hotel create a seamless look of a continuous sweep of urban parkland with the site’s adjacent parks. With its sustainable features and green efforts, the structure gained the World’s Leading Green City Hotel at the World Travel Awards in 2018.

The Stepping Park House

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Stepping Park House by VTN Architects, Photo by Hiroyuki Oki
Bluprint
Stepping Park House by VTN Architects, Photo by Hiroyuki Oki

The majority of the countries in the world experience shortage of green spaces as the world continue to develop industrially. One way that Vietnam addresses it is through the movement of “House for Trees” and part of these houses is the Stepping Park House which is situated in Ho Chi Minh City. With its location being adjacent to a local park, the architects, VTN Architects, took advantage of it by designing the house to appear as an extension to the surrounding environment. The presence of the greeneries is not only limited to the façade but is strategically located inside the house as well. This approach enhances the flow of natural air and the natural display of light and shadows.

The Tao Zhun Yin Yuan Apartment Building

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Tao Zhun Yin Yuan Aparmtent Building by Vincent Callebaut Architectures

Another remarkable structure with an obvious double-helix DNA concept is the Tao Zhun Yin Yuan apartment building in Taiwan. It’s a successful project by Vincent Callebaut Architectures that mainly devotes itself to actively promote carbon-absorbing architecture through the literally twisted vertical ecosystems. The rotation of 4.5 degrees per floor is inspired by the Taiji concept of the unceasing cycle of life. The architectural concept is centered on delivering an eco-friendly design and have the building be energy self-sufficient. The building’s open spaces were covered by lots of trees and greeneries that allow for annual carbon absorption of up to 130 tons which is nearly 5 times higher than the local regulation.

 The Heydar Aliyev Cultural Center 

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Tao Zhun Yin Yuan Aparmtent Building by Vincent Callebaut Architectures

Situated in Baku, Azerbaijan, designed by the renowned Zaha Hadid Architects, the Heydar Aliyev Center was to become the primary building for the nation’s cultural programs. With its unique form and curves, it was clear that the architect’s intention is to relate the design to the population’s understanding of what is Azerbaijani architecture is. The structure aims to create a continuous and free-flowing relationship between the building’s exterior and interior spaces. Today, the center houses three major areas such as the auditorium, the gallery hall, and the museum.

Mactan Cebu International Airport

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Mactan Cebu International Airport T2 by IDA, Budji+Royal, Photo by John Nye

The four-year construction of this second largest airport in the Philippines, The Mactan Cebu International Airport Terminal 2, just ended in 2018.  Dubbed as the world’s first-ever resort airport, it truly welcomes the arriving tourists and becomes the gateway to the abundant tourist resorts in the region. The overall design was the product of the great collaborative effort of the design team which includes the Hong Kong-based architecture firm, Integrated Design Architects, Inc., the renowned Filipino architecture firm BUDJI+ROYAL and the internationally renowned Cebuano furniture designer, Kenneth Cobonpue. One of its distinct features is its main roof structure which is composed of arrays of “glulam” or the “glued laminated timber” arches that is stronger than steel and more resistant to moisture. To date, this is so far the biggest project of its kind in the world.