Homogenous Materials Made The Thalia Boutique Hotel Fun And Nostalgic

The Thalia Boutique Hotel in Vietnam reflects an old city with a modern liberal architectural style. Its stunning location in Hoi An City neighbors a well-preserved heritage site called Ancient Town. Ho Khue Architects builds the accommodation with a design brief to elicit classic nostalgia and propagate a relaxing space for the guests. The client wants a fun structure that prioritizes guest experience rather than maximizing floor area for monetary purposes.

The 475-square-meter boutique hotel delights guests with a straightforward character in a complex space. Country-style tile roof, bare concrete, and laterite patches make the building’s exterior. The nostalgic feeling materializes from the raw concrete finishes that continue into the interior. Consequently, the contemporary execution of these basic elements elevates the overall appearance of the structure.

Alternating concrete planks float at the corners of the hotel. Moreover, the yin and yang tile roof paired with laterite patches makes a charming accent in contrast to the concrete exterior. The strategic placement of plants softened the appearance as well.

The rooms appear as if it slides on top of each other. Thalia Boutique Hotel’s architectural form is unrestrained, and it delivers improvement in modern urban construction. Circular glass windows add a more quirky character to the space. The use of fishnets as added lounge areas contributes immensely to the fun environment that the team wishes to achieve.

Artisan wood crafts emblematic of Hoi An Ancient Town are present throughout the interiors. The little interior details of excellent woodwork complete the relaxing ambiance of the Thalia Hotel. Concrete walls, floor, and ceiling with full-height glass windows frame each room as a serene place.

Ultimately, Ho Khue Architects and the team positions Thalia Boutique Hotel as “a breakthrough urban project where cultural heritage meets the modern world by utilizing non-conventional construction techniques”.

Photo Credits: Hiroyuki Oki